Introduction to the Set of 135 Taiwan Protestant Church Distribution vs Education and Income Levels Maps

This set of Taiwan Protestant church distribution vs education and income levels maps was made in order to provide a means for examining what relationships might be seen between the relative strength of the Protestant churches in a given area and the education and income levels of the residents of that area.

The geographical distribution of the Protestant churches in Taiwan is displayed on each map by using a color code that assigns different colors to each township or large city district depending on the value of the population divided by the number of Protestant churches ratio for that area. In Taiwan this ratio ranges from a low of 218 to a high of 49,593. In the major cities of Taiwan this ratio ranges from 5,802 (for Taipei City) to 9,767 (for Hsinchu City). The overall statistics for all of Taiwan show that this ratio is 7,162, meaning for every 7,162 people in Taiwan there is one Protestant congregation. The yellow and green areas on the maps show where Protestant churches are relatively more plentiful. The orange and red areas show where Protestant churches are very few in relation to the size of the population. The blue and purple areas show where the presence of Protestant churches falls into a middle range. (The data used to calculate the population divided by the number of Protestant churches ratios is from the 2007 – 2008 Taiwan Church Handbook, published by the Christian Information Center, located in Taichung City.)

Median income of individuals levels and various measures of the education levels were added to the basic geographical distribution of Protestant churches maps. This enables one to look for relationships that might be seen between church distribution and education and income levels.

Five different measures of education levels were mapped against the church distribution for each county and major city of Taiwan. These five measures were:

l. “Ten Level Map”. This is the basic map that shows church distribution vs the percentage of the population that falls into each of ten different levels of highest educational attainment. These ten levels are: % illiterate, % self taught, % elementary school graduate, % junior high school graduate, % high school graduate, % vocational high school graduate, % five-year junior college graduate, % university graduate, % having a MS degree, and % having a PhD degree.

2. “Five Level Map”. This map shows the church distribution vs the percentage of the population that falls into five different levels of highest educational attainment. These five levels are: % illiterate, % self taught, % elementary school graduate, % junior high school graduate, and % all levels above junior high school graduate.

3. “Four Level Map”. This map shows the church distribution vs the percentage of the population that falls into four different levels of highest educational attainment. These four levels are: % illiterate; % self taught, elementary school graduate, or junior high school graduate; % senior high school graduate, vocational high school graduate, or five-year junior college graduate: and % university graduate, attained a MS degree, or attained a PhD degree.

4. “Junior High Level Map”. This map shows the church distribution vs the percentage of the population that falls into one of two groups: 1.) Those whose highest educational attainment is junior high school graduate, or lower, and 2.) Those whose highest educational attainment is above junior high school graduate.

5. “College Level Map”. This map also shows the church distribution vs the percentage of the population that falls into one of two groups: 1.) Those whose highest educational attainment is below university graduate, and 2.) Those whose highest educational attainment is university graduate, or have attained a MS degree or a PhD degree.

Using these five maps the examination of the church distribution in a given area vs the highest educational level attained by the residents in that area can be approached from different angles. The Junior High Level maps and the College Level maps may be particularly useful because they divide the population of each area into two groups only. The Junior High Level maps compare church distribution with the percentage of people in each area who have a relatively low level of education. The College Level maps, on the other hand, compare church distribution with the percentage of people in each area who have a high education level.

The sixth map made for every county and major city in Taiwan is one that shows church distribution vs a measure of income. Only one measure of income was available for these maps: the median income of individuals. Statistics for household income were not available.

The highest educational attainment levels and median income of individuals levels used in these maps are from the government’s Taiwan Manpower Utilization Surveys of 2005 and 2006. This data was not available for 69 (19.3%) of the 358 subdivisions of Taiwan. Each area for which this data was not available is indicated on the maps.

This set of 135 maps is being presented to the Christian community in Taiwan with the hope that the maps will yield useful insights for evangelism, discipleship, and the starting of new churches in all parts of the island. May God bless the Church in Taiwan and cause its growth in every city, town, and country area.


George McFall

The Evangelical Alliance Mission (TEAM)

October, 2008

© 2019 Taiwan Missionary Fellowship 臺灣基督教傳教士協會
Design by schefa.com